Volume-3 Issue-8


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Volume-3 Issue-8, February 2019, ISSN: 2394-0913 (Online)
Published By: Blue Eyes Intelligence Engineering & Sciences Publication

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1.

Authors:

Pooja Badotra, Neelima R. Kumar, Rakesh Chauhan

Paper Title:

Proteins Profiling as a Tool for Studying the Biodiversity of PIERIS SPP. (Lepidoptera)

Abstract: India is a land of vast phsiogeographic variability. This subcontinent is rich in floral and faunal diversity. It is not surprising, therefore that the country is one of the richest in the world with respect to butterfly species. Butterflies are the foremost galore cluster of insects on earth that square measure simply recognizable by the overall public due their lovely colors and swish flight .They variate on the basis of sexual variations, individual, seasonal, geographical variations and races. These variations form the raw material for speciation and offer one of the most challenging aspects for the classification of these insects. The conventional morphological methods are of great help in separation of different species and genera. There is need to couple morphological, biological, behavioral and biochemical studies with available taxonomic information to separate insect taxa on the basis of discriminatory characteristics. Such supplementary characters come from biochemical and/ or molecular studies. Protein electrophoresis has emerged as a useful technique in population genetics and now a days been widely applied in systematics. Therefore, the present studies used this technique for the SDS-PAGE characterization and comparison of proteins in the both male and female of Pieris spp. (Pieris canidia indica and Pieris brassicae). It was interesting to note that after the comparison of the data, most of the protein fractions obtained in two species of P. canidia and P. brassicae were found to be common. And further, protein fraction were also common when they were compared within the same species male and female, confirming that these were the characteristic of the genus. So we can conclude that the proteins serve as good markers for the differentiation of species and also for the sexes in the same species. 

Keywords: Biodiversity, Protein profiling, Pieris spp.

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